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Nov 29, 2022
In NEWS
Data reported by the NYPD show police officers in New York City have dramatically increased enforcement against people using cell phone cameras to record the police. Under the city’s new “Right to Record” law, the NYPD must report statistics on how many people are arrested or ticketed while capturing video or pictures of police interactions. People Recording Video of the NYPD are Facing More Punishment. Since 2021, arrests are up 14%, criminal summonses are up 242% and civil summonses are up 611% for people who take out their cameras to record the police in New York.
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Reyets Curated Content
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Oct 27, 2022
Facebook allows police to buy your data and track you ?

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Reyets Curated Content
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Oct 07, 2022
Uvalde school district suspends entire police force, superintendent to retire amid fallout from shooting content media
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Reyets Curated Content
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Aug 09, 2022
In NEWS
Just when you think life online can't get worse than it already is, Meta steps in to prove you wrong. The company's new BlenderBot 3 AI chatbot — which was released in the U.S. just days ago on Friday, August 5 — is already making a host of false statements based on interactions it had with real humans online. Some of the more egregious among those include claims Donald Trump won the 2020 U.S. presidential election and is currently president, anti-Semitic conspiracy theories, as well as comments calling out Facebook for all of its "fake news." This, despite being owned by the company formerly known as Facebook. Read More: #meta #racism #ai
It took just one weekend for Meta's new AI Chatbot to become racist content media
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Reyets Curated Content
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Aug 09, 2022
In NEWS
City council in small town of Vincent votes to terminate police chief, assistant and then whole department The small city of Vincent in Alabama has voted to disband its police force after the revelation of racist text messages exchanged between two of its officers. In the exchange, which recently surfaced on social media, one user named “752” asked: “What do y’all call a pregnant slave?” To this, one person who is not identifiable through the text, responded with question marks. The user named 752 then responded: “BOGO Buy one, get one free.” The messages were first reported by AL.com on Tuesday, the same day the Vincent city council met to decide on the issue. Earlier on Tuesday, the police chief, James Srygley, had said the department had “conducted an internal investigation” and that they had taken “appropriate disciplinary action”. But on Thursday, Srygley himself was identified as one of the officers who was terminated. Assistant chief John L Goss was also terminated, and the city council then voted to disband the whole department. On Friday, the sheriff’s office of Shelby county said in a statement they “condemn these actions” and their office was helping the citizens with emergency law enforcement service. The population of the town, south-east of Birmingham, is about 2,000 as of 2021, with fewer than 500 African Americans, and only eight Hispanic people. #alabama #police #fired Read more:
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Reyets Curated Content
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Aug 09, 2022
In NEWS
A man was wrongfully arrested for standing outside a Bronx courthouse handing out flyers about jury nullification, the practice where juries render "not guilty" verdicts despite overwhelming evidence of guilt, a federal court confirmed last week. Michael Picard, a civil libertarian activist, was taken into custody in late 2017 after police took issue with him passing out papers telling recipients to "Google Jury Nullification," as law enforcement alleged he was in violation of a New York law barring people from standing within 200 feet of a courthouse "calling for or demanding any specified action or determination by such court or jury" in connection with an ongoing case. Read More:
He Was Arrested for Promoting Jury Nullification. A Federal Court Says That Was Illegal. content media
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Reyets Curated Content
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Feb 17, 2022
In CREATIVE JUSTICE
If you're interested in a justice-related art experience, you should definitely check out The Movement Series! "In spring 2022, The Movement Series brings to Greater Boston audiences three programs that center social justice, including performances by Colombia’s Sankofa Danzafro, Marc Bamuthi Joseph’s multimedia project The Just and the Blind, and theAlvin Ailey American Dance Theater. This powerful three-part experience is enhanced by community programming. Join us for these performances, anchored in dance and multimedia, that take audiences on provocative, spiritual and exhilarating journeys." Here's a sneak peek!
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Reyets Curated Content
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Feb 08, 2022
In NEWS
A Black doctor is suing JPMorgan Chase and two employees at the bank's Sugar Land, Texas, branch for racial discrimination after she says she was refused service to open a bank account. Dr. Malika Mitchell-Stewart, 34, completed her residency at the end of last year and planned to open a bank account with a $16,780.16 check at the Chase bank in Sugar Land, according to the lawsuit. The lawsuit claims that when Mitchell-Stewart presented her check to one of the bank's employees, they began to ask questions challenging the validity of the check as well as Mitchell-Stewart's employment as a doctor. The employee then allegedly told Mitchell-Stewart that they had to verify the check with the bank manager, the second employee named in the case, who is not actually a bank manager but an associate banker and lead teller-operations specialist, according to the lawsuit. The second employee allegedly told Mitchell-Stewart that the check was fraudulent without providing justification before turning her away. Mitchell-Stewart then left the bank to avoid being arrested and "had an adverse emotional reaction over this humiliation," according to the lawsuit. "What Dr. Mitchell-Stewart was reminded of on this day was that she is a black woman attempting to deposit $16,000 in a predominantly white affluent suburb - Sugarland, Texas in Ft. Bend County," the lawsuit said. "Solely because of her race, Dr. Mitchell-Stewart was discriminated against by members of Chase’s banking staff and denied services provided to non-African American customers of Chase." #texas #huston #banking #chase #economicjustice #bankingwhileblakc #racisim
Black doctor sues JPMorgan Chase for racial discrimination after being denied service at Texas branch content media
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Reyets Curated Content
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Jan 29, 2022
In NEWS
The Virginia Senate voted Thursday to require police officers to tell drivers why they are being pulled over before requiring them to present their driver’s license and registration. Democrats, who unanimously backed the measure over opposition from Republicans, framed the change as a limited step that could hopefully deescalate traffic stops. “When people are stopped, they generally want to know why,” Sen. Scott Surovell, D-Fairfax, who proposed the measure, told his colleagues. Surovell described the bill as a minor change to state code. He said that if an officer did not follow the new rule, the only legal ramifications would be that the officer would be unable to write a ticket for failure to provide identification, which he said carries a $10 fine and is seldom used. Republican lawmakers unanimously opposed the measure, arguing that it could make police work more dangerous. “I don’t think it’s a terrible imposition on motorists or anybody else to have to provide their driver’s license and registration when a police officer asks for it,” said Sen. John Cosgrove, R-Chesapeake. “To me, this is just a way for lawyers to get somebody off the hook.” The bill now heads to the House of Delegates, where Republicans hold a majority and are unlikely to advance the measure. #virginia #police #stops #laws
Va. Senate votes to require police to tell drivers why they were pulled over content media
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Reyets Curated Content
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Jan 27, 2022
In FILMING THE POLICE
An Arizona House bill would limit when the public could record video of police officers at work. State Rep. John Kavanaugh, a Republican from Fountain Hills, is the sponsor of the bill. HB 2319 would make it illegal to video record police activity without the officer's permission unless the camera is at least 15 feet away. There are exceptions if someone is inside an enclosed structure on private property. "I was contacted by police officers in Tucson," Kavanagh said. Kavanagh said the concern is that cop-watching groups are getting too close, and he is concerned about safety. "The officer doesn't know if this is just a bystander taking a picture or if this is an accomplice or a friend of the person they are arresting and might attack them," Kavanagh said. A first violation would be a petty offense. If the videotaping continued after an officer's verbal warning or it was a repeat offense, the violator could be charged with a misdemeanor. Stacey Champion was issued a criminal citation for crossing a police line after she tried to intervene for a man who was homeless earlier this month. Phoenix police reversed course and declined to pursue charges after Champion's video of the incident was posted on Twitter. Champion said if she had not been recording, "I would probably be in jail or would have gone to jail, most certainly." Kavanagh told ABC15 investigator Melissa Blasius that he may make changes to the bill's wording. "That was certainly not the intent of the bill to stop someone from doing it themselves, and I can easily take care of that," he said. The American Civil Liberties Union opposes the bill, saying people have a First Amendment right to record police activity as long as they are not interfering with law enforcement officers.
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Reyets Curated Content
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Jan 02, 2022
In NEWS
Minimum wage increases, animal protections, police accountability, cutting and increasing taxes are all part of a series of new laws taking effect across the country on Saturday, the first day of 2022. Some of the laws such as abortion restrictions in New Hampshire or police reform measures passed in Illinois, Oregon and North Carolina address some of the most contentious issues of our time. Others, such as a Maine law passed in the aftermath of a September 2019 explosion that killed a firefighter and injured a number of others, are more narrowly focused and were passed to remedy specific situations. The Connecticut Parentage Act allows unmarried, same-sex or nonbiological parents to establish parenting rights through a simple form that gives parents legal capabilities immediately after a child is born. In Kansas, people will be allowed to buy specialized license plates featuring the “Don’t Tread on Me” and coiled snake symbol featured on what’s known as the Gadsden flag. Critics suggested that the Gadsden flag has become a racist symbol that has been adopted by some far-right groups. #laws #abortion #police #reforms #pay Read More
New laws take effect across US on abortion, policing, taxes content media
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