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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Aug 03, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona has a message for schools across the country ahead of the new school year: Students need to be in classrooms. "That's where students learn best," Cardona told NPR's A Martínez. "Schools are more than just places where students learn how to read and write — they're communities. They're like second families to our students." On Monday, the U.S. Education Department will release a roadmap for the return to school, encouraging districts to invest in social and emotional support for students and outlining ways to "accelerate academic achievement." The roadmap also recommends that school systems follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's masking guidance for K-12 schools, which the agency revised last week, recommending "universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to schools, regardless of vaccination status." #students #backtoschool #covid
Students Need To Be In Classrooms, With Masks, This Fall, Education Secretary Says content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Aug 03, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
Before the coronavirus pandemic shuttered schools last year, David Rushing was an energetic 15-year-old who liked to play basketball and baseball. He was an avid swimmer and a member of the Jesse White Tumblers — performing high-energy stunts like backflips and somersaults, sometimes in front of large audiences. Then COVID-19 swept across the country and forced Chicago schools to close, leaving David, who has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder, unable to participate in sports and without the proper support to help him focus in online classes. At the beginning of his freshman year at Dunbar Vocational Career Academy last fall, David’s Individualized Education Program, a legally binding document known as an IEP that outlines what special education services and interventions a student should receive, was set to expire on Nov. 5, 2020. He was to be re-evaluated for a new plan the month before. But that didn’t happen. Within a matter of months, David’s life spiraled out of control. Yvonne Bailey, David’s biological grandmother who adopted him at a young age, noticed David behaving differently. David “got involved with the wrong people in the neighborhood,” Bailey said. “He was running away from home and staying out all night.” David’s case is not isolated. The pandemic year has uprooted support for students with disabilities in Chicago and nationwide, creating a backlog of old IEPs that could lead to widening academic gaps for students in need of special education services. Students with disabilities make up 14.6% of Chicago’s enrollment, almost 50,000 students. Nearly half of those students are Latino, and about 40 percent are Black. #studentswithdisabilities #students #covid #onlineschool
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 29, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
Hundreds of schools across the country, many of them in Arizona, seem to be misreporting or not reporting legally required information on students with disabilities, according to an analysis from the Center for Civil Rights Remedies. The information in question involves students under what’s known as 504 Plans, which includes students with special needs under various circumstances. Data on 504 plans are required to be submitted to the Civil Rights Data Collection, a federal survey administered by the education department’s Office for Civil Rights every other year. “They have a legal and moral obligation,” Dan Losen, Director of the Center for Civil Rights Remedies said. The N4T Investigators reviewed the latest CRDC data that is available, which is for the 2017-2018 school year. Dozens of school districts across Arizona have red flags in their numbers. Dan Losen said that is when the reported numbers are far off from the national average of 2.7 percent of students falling under 504 plans. The Tucson Unified School District, Arizona’s second-largest, is only reporting .04 percent of students under 504 with an enrollment over 46,000. “Zero point four is what we considered to be statistically low – so this is 10 times lower than that. These students have rights but if they don’t get identified it’s unlikely those rights are going to be met,” Losen said. #students #disabilityrights #studentsrights
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 28, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
Robert Parris Moses, a civil rights activist who was shot at and endured beatings and jail while leading Black voter registration drives in the American South during the 1960s and later helped improve minority education in math, has died. He was 86. Moses, who was widely referred to as Bob, worked to dismantle segregation as the Mississippi field director of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee during the civil rights movement and was central to the 1964 “Freedom Summer” in which hundreds of students went to the South to register voters. Moses started his “second chapter in civil rights work” by founding in 1982 the Algebra Project thanks to a MacArthur Fellowship. The project included a curriculum Moses developed to help struggling students succeed in math. Ben Moynihan, the director of operations for the Algebra Project, said he had talked with Moses’ wife, Dr. Janet Moses, and she said her husband had passed away Sunday morning in Hollywood, Florida. Information was not given as to the cause of death. “Bob Moses was a giant, a strategist at the core of the civil rights movement. Through his life’s work, he bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice, making our world a better place,” said the head of the NAACP, Derrick Johnson. #civilrights #educationrights
Bob Moses, civil rights pioneer and crusader for math education, dies at 86 content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 28, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
Teachers and students should wear masks inside classrooms, regardless of whether they are fully vaccinated or not, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Tuesday in a backtrack that comes just three weeks after the government's top public health officials said it was safe for those vaccinated to be maskless inside schools. The updated guidance reflects the rapid increase in infections, transmission and hospitalizations stemming from the spread of the delta variant, including among vaccinated individuals, and comes as the vast majority of schools across the country prepare to welcome students back for in-person learning, full time, five days a week – some for the first time in over a year. "CDC recommends that everyone in K to 12 schools wear a mask indoors, including teachers, staff, students and visitors, regardless of vaccination status," CDC Director Rochelle Walensky said on a press call Tuesday, during which she also recommended that vaccinated people who live in areas with moderate to high transmission rates wear masks in indoor public spaces to help prevent the spread of the new COVID-19 strain. #students #covid #backtoschool https://www.usnews.com/news/education-news/articles/2021-07-27/cdc-teachers-and-students-should-wear-masks-even-those-vaccinated
CDC: Teachers and Students Should Wear Masks content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 27, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
Children who attend schools with high suspension rates are significantly more likely to be arrested and jailed as adults – especially Black and Hispanic boys – according to new research that shines a spotlight on the school-to-prison pipeline. Data have long shown that Black and Hispanic students experience suspension and expulsion at much higher rates than white students, and that as adults, they're also disproportionately represented in the county's prison system. And while research shows a correlation between high levels of education and low levels of criminal activity, there exists little evidence on the role that individual schools can play in their students' future. Researchers from Boston University, the University of Colorado Boulder and Harvard University sought to find whether a causal link exists between students who experience strict school discipline and being arrested or incarcerated as an adult, and whether attending a stricter school influences criminal activity in adulthood. "Our findings show that early censure of school misbehavior causes increases in adult crime – that there is, in fact, a school-to-prison pipeline," the researchers wrote in an article published Tuesday in Education Next. "Any effort to maintain safe and orderly school climates must take into account the clear and negative consequences of exclusionary discipline practices for young students, and especially young students of color, which last well into adulthood." #schooltoprisonpipeline #students #juveniledelinquency https://www.usnews.com/news/education-news/articles/2021-07-27/study-confirms-school-to-prison-pipeline
Study Confirms School-to-Prison Pipeline content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 27, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
Elementary school students in the United States ended the 2020-21 school year four to five months behind where they normally would have been in academic achievement, according to a report by the consulting firm McKinsey & Co. that was released Tuesday. It found that many of the most vulnerable students experienced the steepest setbacks. The new report — based on assessments taken by more than 1.6 million elementary school students who had returned to the classroom in the spring — is the latest indication that students who were already experiencing educational inequities were also hit hardest by the crisis. For example, students attending schools whose student bodies were mainly Black or Hispanic ended the school year six months behind where they normally would have been in math, compared with four months behind for students in mainly white schools. Similarly, students who attended a school where the average household income was less than $25,000 a year were seven months behind in math by the end of the term, compared with four months behind for schools where the average income was greater than $75,000. “The pandemic hit everyone, but it hit kids who were already vulnerable hardest,” said Emma Dorn, an associate partner at McKinsey and the lead author of the report. “That really widens some of the pre-existing opportunity and achievement gaps we were already facing in our country,” Ms. Dorn said. #students #onlineschool #covid
U.S. students ended the pandemic school year 4 to 5 months behind, a new report finds. content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 22, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
California will permanently begin providing free school meals for students this fall in a move that many advocates are praising as a big step toward ending food insecurity. The state says it will be the first in the nation to make free meals permanent for all public school students, regardless of their family's income. "No questions. No stigma. ALL California kids now have access to free meals at schools," California Gov. Gavin Newsom tweeted last week, linking to an article announcing the news. Almost 60% of California's 6.2 million students qualified for free or reduced-price meals in the 2019-2020 school year, according to School Meals for All, a coalition made up of more than 200 organizations that has pushed for funding in the state budget to gain momentum. In the last year, the pandemic's financial fallout pushed child hunger to record levels, even in the richest US counties. "Right now, nearly 20% of all California households -- and 27.3% of Latinx households with children and 35.5% of Black households with children -- report food insecurity," School Meals for All said in a news release last month. "This is double pre-pandemic rates, impacting about 8 million Californians." Universal free lunch programs ensure no one falls through the cracks and eliminate the stigma associated with qualifying for free or reduced-price meals because of family income, the coalition said. #students #foodinsecurity #california
California will begin permanently offering free meals to all public school students this fall content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 21, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
As principal Daniel Kramer pored over data tracking whether Roosevelt High School’s freshmen and sophomores were staying on track amid the pandemic, he noticed a troubling trend: While girls had held their own as coronavirus tested the school, boys were falling behind, widening a longstanding gender gap at the predominantly Latino school on Chicago’s Northwest Side. This past school year, Chicago leaders pointed to grading and attendance numbers as evidence the pandemic had caused more academic damage for the district’s Black and Latino students. But data obtained by Chalkbeat shows even more dramatic disparities when gender is factored in. Black and Latino boys, who have long faced the largest gaps in the district, saw steeper drops in attendance and a sharper increase in failing grades than girls. The boys also saw only a modest uptick in As, which at the high school level increased markedly for white and Asian students and for Latinas. “This past year was really difficult for everyone,” said Jenny Nagaoka of the University of Chicago Consortium on School Research. “But it’s really striking to see the outcomes for young men of color in particular.” Comparing pandemic student outcomes to previous years is tricky, given the profound shift in how students learned. Still, emerging national data appears to back up Chicago’s numbers about the uneven impact on boys and young men of color. Experts are only beginning to dig into why male students might have been harder hit, but they are urging districts to invest in efforts tailored to the needs of boys as part of a national pandemic recovery push. Such efforts, if successful, could be significant: Nationally, young men of color have remained less likely than girls to graduate from high school — with a 15 percentage point gap between Black boys and girls in Chicago — and then go on to college and well-paying careers. #students #onlineschool #covid
Emerging evidence shows the pandemic may have hit boys harder — not just in Chicago but nationally content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 21, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
Most inmates in-state and federal prisons have access to a high school education. But when it comes to college, not much is known about what’s available. It’s one of the key hurdles Erin Castro is trying to overcome. She’s the co-founder of the University of Utah’s Prison Education Project and said to do that, we first need better data. “We've known for a long time that there is a strong relationship between educational attainment and one's life chances of becoming incarcerated,” Castro said. “At this point in time, it is really difficult to answer questions about higher education in prison.” Nationally, about 25% of inmates don’t have a high school education. Fewer than 4% have a college degree, compared to 29% of the general public, according to a study from the Prison Policy Initiative. Along with several other researchers around the country, Castro recently released the first of a multi-part study examining the landscape of higher education opportunities across the U.S. prison system, which vary widely across the country and even within states. The first part of the study looks into admissions, enrollment and funding for higher ed programs. Researchers surveyed 60 programs across the U.S. — not an exhaustive or representative list, but one they hope will provide some initial clues to help expand opportunity and improve the quality of the programs. Of the programs surveyed, most are run by a college or university and offered in-person classes at prisons or jails. Only six offer primarily remote instruction, but each serve an average of 26 correctional facilities. Many facilities, Castro said, such as Utah’s Draper Prison, don’t allow online classes due to security concerns, which can limit the number of students who can enroll. #educationrights #prisoneducation #students
Study On Prison Education Seeks To Fill Long-Standing Gaps In Data content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 21, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
A college student suffered "heinous, cruel and malicious acts" as she was kidnapped and murdered two years ago by a man she mistook for her Uber driver, a South Carolina prosecutor told jurors Tuesday. The woman, Samantha Josephson, was out with her friends, just months short of graduating from the University of South Carolina, before she was killed on March 29, 2019, authorities said. Authorities said Josephson, 21, a native of Robbinsville, New Jersey, was in Columbia's Five Points entertainment district when she got into Nathaniel Rowland's black Chevrolet Impala, believing it was her ride home. Fifth Circuit Solicitor Byron Gipson told jurors that they would be shown security video, cellphone tracking data, the murder weapon and other incriminating evidence that would lead to a finding of guilty. "It's those intentional deliberate, heinous, cruel and malicious acts that Nathaniel David Rowland has been indicted for kidnapping Samantha Josephson. He's been indicted for murdering Samantha Josephson," Gipson said. "And he's been indicted for possession of a weapon from the commission of a violent crime. And at the appropriate time, we'll ask that you return verdicts on guilty on each one of those counts," Gipson said. #students #studentsafety
Student killed after taking car she mistook for Uber was victim of 'heinous' acts, prosecutor says content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 20, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
A student loan borrower bill of rights may be coming to your state. Here’s what you need to know — and what it means for your student loans. While student loan borrowers await the prospect of wide-scale student loan cancellation, there’s a growing trend that could help provide student loan relief. It’s called a student loan borrower bill of rights. States including California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Virginia and Washington have implemented policies to help student loan borrowers. This may be especially important to student loan borrowers, since federal student loan payments are scheduled to resume starting October 1. Read the full article for details on how they work and what they mean for your student loans: #students #studentloans #studentrights
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 20, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
In a new political low in Texas, the Republican-dominated state Senate has passed a bill to eliminate a requirement that public schools teach that the Ku Klux Klan and its white supremacist campaign of terror are “morally wrong.” The cut is among some two dozen curriculum requirements dropped in the measure, along with studying Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, the works of United Farm Workers leader Cesar Chavez, Susan B. Anthony’s writings about the women’s suffragist movement, and Native American history. Critics say the state is promoting an “anti-civics” education. Senate Bill 3 — passed last Friday 18-4 — drops most mentions of people of color and women from the state’s required curriculum. That includes eliminating a requirement that students be taught the “history of white supremacy, including but not limited to the institution of slavery, the eugenics movement, and the Ku Klux Klan, and the ways in which it is morally wrong.” #students #texas #criticalracetheory
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 15, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
With universities prepping for a return to in-person teaching and on-campus living this fall, Republican lawmakers have spent recent weeks attempting to block public and private institutions from requiring students to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Right-wing media outlets have, in turn, pounced on the controversy, making campus vaccine requirements the latest front in their insurgency against the White House’s herd immunity plan. During a Wednesday night appearance on Fox News, Charlie Kirk, the cofounder of the pro-Trump youth group Turning Point USA, drew a parallel between student vaccine requirements and the racist caste system once mandated in South Africa. “We are going to give everything we have to make sure that students are not going to have to live in a medical apartheid because they don’t want to get the vaccine,” Kirk told Tucker Carlson. “It’s almost this apartheid-style open-air hostage situation, like, Oh, you can have your freedom back if you get the jab. This is unacceptable; we’re going to fight back against it.” Carlson, who falsely claimed in May that a subversive “national [vaccination] mandate” is being imposed on college students, affirmed his guest, saying, “That’s exactly right.” Kirk used his time on Tucker Carlson Tonight to announce Turning Point USA’s new “No Forced Vax” campaign, which will “fight back against forced campus vaccinations” and supposedly operate chapters in 2,500 high schools and universities, according to a press release. “Rogue administrators are trying to thwart [students’] educational goals and force them to publicly share their medical history,” the group’s website states. “The government has taken many strides to ease their way into private [citizens’] lives, and mandatory vaccinations are the newest way in which they can do so.” The campaign will also host “hundreds of local gatherings, school tabling events this fall, and a larger digital campaign designed to educate and embolden local health care officials, teachers, administrators, students, and parents to defend a student’s right to choose.” #vaccination #covid #students #antivax #students #conservatives
The Right-Wing Vaccine Rebellion Has Arrived On Campus content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 15, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
Critical Race Theory (CRT) examines how racism remains embedded in societal structures, but the very idea that racism still exists sends some conservatives into orbit. Critical Race Theory has become convenient shorthand for conservatives too lazy to engage with the theory itself. Instead, the theory has become the umbrella term for everything wrong with America’s direction. Predictably, that includes trans rights. According to research by Media Matters, right-wing pundits on Fox have been indiscriminately lumping trans issues into Critical Race Theory as part of an overall attempt to fuel viewer grievances. “The network’s hosts and guests have often simultaneously brought up the topic alongside mentions and discussions of trans people, using both topics to portray the left as extreme,” Media Matters, a media watchdog for right-wing sites, notes. “Fox News figures regularly compared the two topics to each other, claiming that they are both ‘designed to divide’ people, that transgender rights silence women while discussions about race silence white people, and that teaching about race or gender identity will lead to ‘dumber’ kids and a weaker military.” The right has moved the description of Critical Race Theory from an academic concept to an assault on grammar and high school students. The fact that the theory isn’t actually being taught in schools doesn’t matter. And since trans students have already been a target for the right wing, why not lump them into Critical Race Theory? That’s exactly what Fox News talking heads have been doing. #criticalracetheory #students #transrights #transstudents #foxnews
The right wing is lumping trans student rights in with Critical Race Theory content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 14, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
Illinois is now the first state to require public schools to teach a unit of Asian American history. Governor J.B. Pritzker signed the Teaching Equitable Asian American History Act (TEAACH) into law last Friday. Per a statement, the legislation—set to take effect in elementary and high schools across the state in the 2022-23 school year—calls for instruction on Asian American history in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as contributions made by Asian Americans in such diverse fields as the arts, sciences and civil rights. State legislators introduced the bill amid a surge in violence against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI). Last year, reports Masood Farivar for Voice of America, anti-Asian hate crimes in 16 of the United States’ most populous cities increased almost 150 percent over the previous year. Many in the AAPI community attributed the uptick at least in part to the racist language used by former President Donald Trump and his allies when describing the coronavirus. More recently, writes Kimmy Yam for NBC News, researchers documented a 169 percent surge in anti-Asian hate crimes during the first quarter of 2021. “Asian American history is American history. Yet we are often invisible,” says State Representative Jennifer Gong-Gershowitz, who co-sponsored the legislation, in the statement. “... Empathy comes from understanding. We cannot do better unless we know better. A lack of knowledge is the root cause of discrimination and the best weapon against ignorance is education.” #asianhistory #AAPI #students #illinois
Illinois Becomes First State to Mandate Teaching Asian American History content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 14, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
Academic achievement gaps and social and emotional learning loss are all major concerns spiraling out of the coronavirus pandemic, especially for low-income students and students of color. Now parents, teachers and policymakers can add one more to that list of concerns: The "thriving gap." A new study shows the combined impact of academic, social and emotional learning loss among high school students who learned remotely last year compared to those who attended school in person, coining the term thriving gap to characterize the negative repercussions that were nearly universal among all who learned remotely. "Many news stories have reported on individual stories of teenagers who have suffered from anxiety, depression and other mental health challenges during the pandemic," says Angela Duckworth, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, founder and CEO of Character Lab and lead of author of the new study published Wednesday in Educational Research, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. "This study gives some of the first empirical evidence of how learning remotely has affected adolescent well-being," she says. The new research shows that high school students who attended school remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic suffered socially, emotionally and academically compared with those who attended in person, which seems obvious enough on its face. https://www.usnews.com/news/education-news/articles/2021-07-14/remote-students-of-all-races-incomes-suffered-during-pandemic #remotelearning #covid #students #onlineschool #mentalhealth
Remote Students of all Races, Incomes Suffered During Pandemic content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 13, 2021
In COMMUNITY FEED
The NCAA faced a moment of reckoning this spring when Oregon women’s basketball player Sedona Prince shared a video showing that, although there was ample space for a weight room at the NCAA women’s basketball tournament, the NCAA had only given the women a tiny fraction of the equipment it had provided the men. That unequal treatment isn’t new: Athletes in women’s college sports have consistently received less investment and support from the NCAA than their counterparts in men’s sports. But this year, athletes and coaches in women’s basketball, softball, women’s volleyball and women’s golf spoke out about it — and the world was clearly listening. The NCAA was forced to apologize and improve the weight room at the women’s tournament, and it eventually hired an independent firm to conduct an equity review of its championship events. “When we start talking about these things and when student athletes speak up about it, that’s how change happens,” Prince told “Good Morning America” in April. “And you can see when we all spoke up about it and used our voices, there was change. … We started, like, a movement for sure.” Importantly, that movement is expanding beyond student-athletes and others who are directly involved in college sports. According to a new survey by the organization College Pulse, college students are overwhelmingly saying that enough is enough when it comes to gender equity and name, image and likeness rights in college sports. #students #NCAA #genderequity #studentathletes
Even Students Who Aren’t Athletes Think The NCAA Is A Problem content media
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Olivia Hilepo
First Supporter
First Supporter
Jul 13, 2021